C6orf70, neuronal migration and periventricular heterotopia

Radial migration. The fact that neurons find their place in the cortex during development is nothing short of a miracle. Many neurons originate in the subventricular zone, i.e. the area lining the ventricles. During brain development, these neurons subsequently climb outwards to their final positions using radial glia cells as scaffolds. If this delicate process is disturbed, neurons may be misplaced. Periventricular nodular heterotopia (PVNH) is a condition in which defects in neuronal migration result in ectopic neuronal nodules lining the ventricles. These nodules may result in a broad range of epilepsies, ranging from mild seizure disorders to intractable epilepsy with intellectual disability. Many cases of PVNH are assumed to be genetic, and FLNA and ARFGEF2 as known causative genes. However, the cause remains unknown in a significant number of patients. In a recent paper in Brain, C6orf70 is identified as a new candidate for PVNH using a clever combination of array CGH and exome sequencing. Continue reading

Somatic mutations affecting the mTOR pathway in hemimegalencephaly

Mutations, but not germline. Many of the genetic alterations that we aim to investigate within the EuroEPINOMICS projects are so-called germline mutations. In the case of de novo events, these mutations have occurred in the germ cells themselves or in very early development. In the case of autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance, the mutations have been transmitted from parents. In either case, the mutation can be found in every cell of the body. Cancer research is mainly focussed on somatic mutations, which give rise to malignant transformation in already differentiated tissues. In fact, many of the techniques that we currently use in neurogenetics were developed to study somatic genetic aberrations. Array comparative genomic hybridization for example, had initially been established for these purposes before expanding the focus to germline microdeletions and microduplications. While the role of somatic mutations in cancer research is well established, the role somatic rather than germline genetic alterations play in other disorders is mainly speculative. Some initial evidence for somatic point mutations has recently been found in Proteus syndrome, a rare overgrowth syndrome. Activating somatic mutations in AKT1 have recently been identified in this disorder. A recent paper by Lee and colleagues now identifies mutations in several genes in the mTOR pathway in patients with hemimegalencephaly, a severe form of brain malformation. Continue reading