CACNA2D2, the ducky mouse, and what it takes to be an epilepsy gene

Subunit. Spontaneous mouse mutants help to identify candidate genes for disease mechanisms and have hinted at an important role for ion channels in epilepsy long before the first human channelopathies were identified. The ducky mouse has absence seizures and suffers from ataxia. A truncation mutation in CACNA2D2 could be identified in this phenotype, encoding for an auxiliary calcium channel subunit. This finding emphasizes the role of calcium channels in absence seizures and begs the question whether genetic variation in CACNA2D2 is also involved in human epilepsy. A recent publication in PLOS One now identifies the second recessive CACNA2D2 mutation in a patient with epileptic encephalopathy. But are two independent cases sufficient anymore to claim causality? Continue reading