The OMIM epileptic encephalopathy genes – a 2014 review

EIEE1-19. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is one of the most frequently accessed online databases for information on genetic disorders. Genes for epileptic encephalopathies are organized within a phenotypic series entitled Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy (EIEE). The EIEE phenotypic series currently lists 19 genes (EIEE1-19). Let’s review the evidence for these genes as of 2014. Continue reading

One in four – the carrier rate of recessive diseases

How frequent? With all the genetic information around, we are often wondering how much genetic morbidity is really hidden in our genomes. Yes, everybody is a knock-out for 1-3 genes, but in most cases, these variants do not cause disease. However, what happens if you apply genomics to estimate the burden of known disease variants? Now in a recent paper in Genetics in Medicine by Lazarin and colleagues, the carrier frequency for ~400 variants known to cause ~100 recessive disorders is investigated. 24% of all individuals are carriers for at least one recessive disorder. Continue reading

Recessive mutations in autism – the return of hidden metabolic disorders

My wrong guesses of 2012. Two weeks ago during a presentation, I had to admit that there is little evidence for a large contribution of recessive or compound heterozygous mutations in epileptic encephalopathies. At the beginning of 2012, I had initially suggested that recessive or compound heterozygous mutation of known neurometabolic disorders could be identified through exome sequencing in sporadic epileptic encephalopathies. However, as of 2013, there is little evidence for this in our data or the data from other consortia. Now, two papers in Cell suggest a significant contribution of recessive mutations in autism including a revival of the “hidden neurometabolic hypothesis”. Continue reading