A polygenic trickle of rare disruptive variants in schizophrenia

Polygenic. Schizophrenia is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that is assumed to be caused by a mixture of genetic and non-genetic factors. The genetic component in schizophrenia is thought to be polygenic, i.e. due to the interaction of multiple genetic factors. Rare variants may play a particular role in this presumable polygenic genetic architecture, but so far this component of the genetic morbidity has been hard to pin down. Now, a recent study in Nature explores the role of rare, disruptive mutations in schizophrenia using large-scale population-based exome sequencing. Let’s find out about a new level of exome-wide honesty and why even a gene with 10 disruptive mutations in cases and none in controls is only mentioned in passing. Continue reading

Less is more – gene identification in epileptic encephalopathies through targeted resequencing

Exome no more. Over the last 15 months, we have repeatedly discussed how exome sequencing or genome sequencing is applied to neurodevelopmental disorders in order to discover new candidate genes and to assess the role of known candidate genes. We have also wondered sometimes whether exome sequencing is the most straightforward approach. Now – outpacing the two large international consortia using exome sequencing in epileptic encephalopathies – a recent study in Nature Genetics uses a different approach to uncover the genetic basis in 10% of patients with epileptic encephalopathies.  Targeted resequencing or gene panel analysis is a hybrid technology between candidate gene sequencing and next generation sequencing and focuses only on a subset of candidate genes. While their study provides a comprehensive overview over the genetics of rare epilepsy syndromes, it raises the question whether the era of large-scale exome sequencing is coming to a natural end. Continue reading